Mission Of This Blog


The overall mission statement of this blog is to share many unique topics of this blogger's interest. Topics include (but are not limited to): Southern Cultural Heritage, Local History of the South Carolina Upstate, Confederate Heritage Preservation & Awareness, Americana, Nature & Wildlife Preservation, Science & Science Fiction, Astronomy & Night Sky Photography, Literacy & Writing, Travel & Local Places Of Interest, Southern Cuisine, Popular Culture & Philosophy, Classic Animation Nostalgia, Fandom ....as well as various other topics explained from the blogger's point of view. The following website contains the UNCENSORED thoughts and opinions of a Southern-born country writer from upstate South Carolina - the living, beating heart of the great American Southland!

Sunday, June 28, 2015

Why Hatred Of The Dixie Cross Banner Is A Pro-White Supremacist Viewpoint

And Only The Forces Of Bigotry Will Win If We Allow It Or Accept It To.
 
Why Hatred of the Dixie Cross Banner is a Pro-White Supremacist Viewpoint 

By: C.W. Roden


"Silence in the face of evil is itself evil: God will not hold us guiltless. Not to speak is to speak, not to act is to act." 
~Deitrich Bonhoeffer 
  
"He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it."

 ~ Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 


Dedicated to ALL Southern people who honor the South's noble flag,
those who will no longer stand silent, nor fail to speak out against its misuse by evil.


Hatred of the Confederate flag - indeed hatred of Confederate heritage itself - is a pro-white supremacist viewpoint.

Yes, I said it, and I stand by that 100%.  

As I pointed out in my previous blog post, all legitimate Confederate heritage organizations and the Sons of Union Veterans Civil War (SUVCW) as well as several other groups, including the Cherokee and Choctaw Tribes of America, have all passed resolutions in the late 80s and early 90s condemning the misuse of the Confederate flag as a symbol of hatred.

These acts were especially significant because they were committed by the lineal descendants of both Confederate soldiers and those Union soldiers who fought against them during the War Between the States (American Civil War) 1861 - 1865...virtually the only people today who have a moral right to define what that flag and its heritage truly stands for.

Since that time, Southern heritage organizations have been working to promote the positive aspects of that heritage, often times with good results and other times with negative ones.

The good being that today any news story about such a misuse cannot be reported without some noble defender of Southern culture and Confederate heritage speaking out against the misuse of that flag, and condemning the hatred some bigot tries to associate with it. Southerners of all ethnicity and faiths, Americans and others around the world with Confederate ancestry all honor it openly and push back hard against any attempt to do away with its public or personal display.

The negative being that sometimes Southern heritage activists choose to completely ignore the impact such misuses have and push the flag's display without first making efforts at advancing proper education to the public about the flag's display and its full history - both the good and the bad.

I personally feel that full disclosure ultimately creates open and proper dialogue with those who have no particular feeling on the flag, or its continued public and private displays.

Creating any sort of proper dialogue with those who stand opposed to the display of that flag in any context whatsoever is another matter.

As I pointed out in my last blog post, many of those anti-Southern and anti-Confederate heritage regressives who stand with the Opposition believe their actions serve the greater social and political good -- at least as they would define the concept. Some of them are not always the narrow-minded fanatics who drink the kool-aid of politically correct ideology and close their minds and hearts to any thinking that doesn't conform to their own worldview.

In fact, some of them are people who have genuinely encountered ignorance and hatred displayed by someone who bore that honored standard wrongly. The result being a jaded worldview regarding any display and an automatic suspicion of anyone who feels the need to honor it. Such people are not evil in any sense of the word, nor do they necessarily deserve to be condemned.

Also, I do not necessarily speak of certain organizations as a whole who promote modern civil rights. The organizations themselves are made up of diverse groups of individuals, many of whom may not approve of the national policies of their various groups, or the current leaderships and their goals.

For example, though a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, I personally do not approve of the recent actions of the SCV leadership in regards to the Florida Division SCV's omission of a marker for Union soldiers at the Olustee National Battlefield in Florida. I feel that the American men who died there deserve to have that marker, even if they were the "enemy" -- I'd say the same if one wanted to place another marker for British Loyalists at the Kings Mountain National Battlefield in my native South Carolina. That's just my sense of honor when it comes to respect for those American-born men who fought in America's Wars.

However, it is about one particular segment of the Opposition that I would like to address. Groups of individuals who care nothing for open discussions with those who honor that flag or Southern heritage as a whole - or at least "Southern heritage" that isn't defined by them, or their useful idiots. Who feel any sort of dialogue is beneath them, and view anyone who disagrees with their own set opinions with nothing but contempt.

These are people who hear the words of Southern heritage activists, of groups and individuals who seek nothing more than to honor their ancestry, their blood and their heritage peacefully and without malice - and reject any gesture of good will, while at the same time applying broad labels to others, mocking them, calling them any sort of vile, hateful name; all the while patting themselves on the backs for being oh-so "tolerant" and "progressive" (at least by their own questionable definition of said terms).

Such is the mentality of the politically correct drone, a person who gives lip-service to individual liberty, but condemns anyone who does not meet or conform to all political and social standards they share. Sometimes even failure to conform to a single aspect of the current politically correct ideology (Example: opposing the death penalty and also opposing abortion) will earn someone the labels: racist, sexist, bigot, homophobic, ect. 

The message from these anti-Southern and Confederate heritage reactionaries is quite clear: Conform Or Be Labeled.

All of this in the name of faux compassion and empathy -- claiming to speak up for black Americans and other minorities, all of whom are more than capable of speaking up for themselves as individuals and need no "great white hope" in the form of a typical white Liberal to be their mouthpiece. I'd personally consider a lower part of the anatomy to describe what they are, but I will refrain out of respect for any women reading. Indulgence of ignorance for the sake of uselessly saying "I feel your pain" is not compassion, not empathy. For the politically correct drone, it has never truly been about protecting people harmed by the sight of that flag. What it has really been about is using the issue to convince others - including themselves - of their own alleged moral righteousness.

Such people cannot comprehend how anyone - regardless of what color their skin, or their faith - can proudly call themselves a Confederate descendant, display the Dixie Cross as a living cultural symbol; while at the same time be a proud American who lives mentally in the 21st century, while respecting positive values of the past. Their own emotional attachment to their "progressive" ideology cannot allow for the idea that anyone who doesn't meet their own rigid standards of "tolerant" could be capable of any act of good will.

They cannot understand, or simple choose not to understand.

No, they shout. If you fly that flag, or put it on your car, you have to be a racist! If you're a minority who displays it you've been brainwashed! If you refuse to put it away and "get your mind right" we're going to come after you and shame you, berate you, attack you with all we have!

I have seen this mentality in action for the last 23 years. I have seen all efforts at working towards promoting the positive aspects of Confederate heritage and identity and the people who do so attacked relentlessly. I have seen what amounts to rage at any effort to honor the Southern dead - recognized American Veterans. I have seen monuments removed, flags torn down, and even suggestions that graves be relocated, for no better reason than the words: "someone was offended."

What drives this thinking - if you want to call politically correctness "thinking" (I personally call those words together the biggest oxymoron ever thought up by the human race) this drive to attack anyone who disagrees with them and displays that flag stubbornly and proudly in the face of such character attacks?

You ask any PC drone, the best answer you will always get nine-out-of-ten-times would be some variation on the words: White supremacists adopted that flag, it's been co-opted as their symbol, and its therefore racist. 

White supremacist groups who continue to misuse the Dixie Cross and co-opt it have no legitimate claim to that flag. Indeed the official banners of the Ku Klux Klan in America are the United States Flag and the Christian Flag. Neo-Nazi groups rarely misuse the Confederate flag, or display the US flag, opting instead to display the traditional swastika banners of Nazi Germany. More often one will find the Betsy Ross banner at a Neo-Nazi rally in America than one will find a Dixie Cross.

As I pointed out, Confederate heritage organizations, and various individuals in American and around the world, both disagree and actively speak out against that....and rightly so! In doing so, we as Southerners and Americans take away the power of that flag in the wrong hands to cause pain to our fellow human beings. We take a realistic and powerful stand against said white supremacist attitudes and move forward as a Southern culture, and as individuals.

This is not good enough for the anti-Confederate flag reactionaries of the Opposition, so they oppose us. They mock the efforts, and actively stand in the way of any attempt to educate others to speak out against such misuses, decrying it as nonsense - and in doing so actively support the continued misuse of the Dixie Cross and, by extension, those who commit said misuse and their own twisted racial ideology. 

That my friends is what makes hatred of the Confederate flag pro-white supremacist, and those people who attack Southern heritage defenders to be indirect bigots as well. When you stand against those preserve and honor the positives of that flag for all Southerners, when you reject the premise of a living Southern heritage and identity, when you label anyone who disagrees with you, then you not only conform to a worldview that continues to permit wrong-thinking agents of bigotry to use the flag as a tool of terror, you actually offer your personal stamp of approval for such acts. In short you offer legitimacy to those who choose to inflict terror with that flag as opposed to recognizing the positive display of that symbol as one of personal pride and identity for Southerners of all color and creeds.

Whenever I put that flag on a grave, wear it on a t-shirt, and carry it on a Confederate Memorial Day or US Veteran's Day parade, I am comfortable knowing I honor that flag for all the right reasons. I am a member of the SCV and a Confederate descendant, and I proudly work with them to promote the positives of the flag, and its role in a vast tapestry of Southern heritage and history - as well as its continue positive role in promoting a living cultural identity that millions across the world proudly honor.

I am also proud to know that in doing so I stand against the mentality of a narrow-minded bigot who would wrongly throw that flag in the face of another human being to feed their own anger and hatred. I am also proud to say I have done so on a personal level as well.

The same cannot truly be said of the Opposition. When that person says: I believe that flag is a racist symbol. I respond with: Well buddy, so does the guy in the white sheet shouting the ugly slurs. The truth of the matter is when you call that flag racist, and they label those who really honor that flag and reject such bigotry as racist, you are morally accepting the misuse of that flag by haters as the norm - and by extension offering your personal endorsement of the pain caused by such wrongful misuse.

So what does that say about you?

In my opinion, it says a hell of a lot.

Thankfully those of us who honor that flag's true heritage don't share the same misguided, pro-white supremacist viewpoint.  

We move forward. So haters, why can't you?

Have a nice day, y'all!

15 comments:

  1. rac·ist
    ˈrāsəst/
    noun
    1.
    a person who believes that a particular race is superior to another.
    synonyms: racial bigot, racialist, xenophobe, chauvinist, supremacist More
    adjective
    noun: racist; plural noun: racists; adjective: racist
    1.
    having or showing the belief that a particular race is superior to another.
    "we are investigating complaints about racist abuse at the club"

    The article mentioned Cherokee, Choctaw, and those who support southern heritage yet I am perplexed toward which race hatred of the confederate flag is ¨racist.¨ Concerning the last question mentioning guys in white sheets and those who believe the flag to be a racist symbol having similar views and what it says about them. Well I am sure if you asked members of either of the aforementioned groups what color the sun was, they would concur that it is yellow. What does it say about them then? Well I guess they can both clearly see the obvious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Listen did it ever occur to you that a race could be superior to another? Did it ever occur to you that their are differences between races? God did not use a cookie cutter when he made people.



      Delete
    2. Oh the idea did occur to me, though I find myself rejecting it based on genetics and modern science. Human beings are the same genetically. We share the same blood and the same basic structure that God and nature gave us. The differences in race based on skin, hair and eye color are superficial. Also I reject the concept of a "pure racial identity" entirely. Even the so-called purest European whites are related genetically to people of color that existed a very long time ago (ever heard of the Celtic-Egyptian theory?). Same with the darkest blacks in Africa and the Middle East, or anyone else.

      I identify as white, though I don't think of myself as superior to anyone, or more culturally privileged, or guilty of anything some hypothetical ancestor was responsible for. I don't believe in racial superiority, racial inferiority, or racial guilt and privilege - not do I tolerate anyone regardless of their political views trying to shove any of those things down my throat. (No Josephine I am not saying that you are, but I do want you to know where I stand).

      No God did not make us the same on the outside, but even a few genetic markers one way or another and skin pigmentation does not make us the same, nor does it make any one ethnic group superior or inferior one way or another. What does make us the same is the fact we all possess the same divine spark that God gave to the human race as a whole. That is the only thing that matters.

      Delete
  2. I thank you for your response.
    Your definition of the term racist is fairly accurate, and I believe taken word-for-word from Websters.

    The flag itself isn't simply a historical banner, but rather a symbol of a "living" heritage -- meaning a heritage that continues to evolve over the course of time while holding to certain time-honored values such as respect for the dead and for a sense of honor and duty many of the descendants today share with those who fought that war.

    Those who continue misuse the Confederate flag (Dixie Cross) today primarily use it as a tool to promote white or Anglo supremacist ideology. That such people hold any valid claim to that flag and its history today is highly questionable, particularly to descendants of Confederate soldiers.

    Most people today who display that flag honorably have no agenda beyond a sense of regional pride, or showing respect for the Southern dead of that war. Confederate descendants come in a diverse group of people, not all of them Anglo, and in some cases not even American-born. Blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans can claim Confederate ancestry, and there are a number that do proudly today. The number of people who have mixed ethnic ancestry also claim this heritage.

    Naturally the latter thinking is in direct conflict with white supremacist ideology, which has nothing to do with a "living" culture, rather one that supports a stagnant one.

    Southern cultural heritage -- like all other successful cultures -- does not exist in a vacuum. It move forward, while certain positive values stand the test of time. It can be successfully argued that the Dixie Cross, for all the negative baggage attached, likewise has positive culture values that are representative of that living cultural heritage.

    Of course, the notion of a living Southern heritage is also pretty much at odds with modern "political correctness" and Left-wing philosophies, which believe its possible to simply cherry-pick some aspects of cultural identity, while dismissing others. It also involves a collectivist mindset that gives only lip-service to individual liberty -- or tolerates it so long as it conforms to the will of the collective thinking.

    Disagreeing with the display of that flag is one thing which I accept even if I cannot condone, but when someone goes further and actively fights against those who speak out against white supremacist misuse of that flag and labels those who disagree with their own philosophies as "racist" despite any truth to the charge, then that person has committed an injustice that some view as on par with an act of ethnic discrimination.

    In short: that person has committed an act of hate themselves.

    As for your last statement about both white supremacists and flag opponents seeing the obvious....well, I would personally find little satisfying about sharing much in common with people who see human beings who don't share one's skin color as sub-humans unworthy of respect, or people who choose to label and marginalize folks who refuse to conform to their political philosophies.

    Thankfully I do not.

    Anyhow, again I thank you for your post, and for the feedback on the article.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I don't consider the Confederate flag to be racist. However, I do consider it to be the flag of traitors who were willing to kill over 100,000 US soldiers to defend their right to own another human being.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That would be understandable....if one accepts the idea that secession in 1861 was in fact "treason". Technically secession from the Union was not formally ruled as illegal until a US Supreme Court case: Brown Vs. Texas (1869). Four years AFTER the war ended.
      No Confederate soldier or statesman was tried for treason. Jefferson Davis was never tried for treason, even though he asked to be tried.

      It can also be argued that since Confederate soldiers are legally recognized as American Veterans, and since US President Theodore Roosevelt by executive order returned the captured Confederate flags to the South, any alleged "treason" has long since been pardoned - not that I feel those men needed one at all.

      Add to that the fact that Southern-born US soldiers who were proudly descendants of those men who wore the gray and butternut themselves carried the Southern flag with them in ALL of America's foreign wars since WW1 to present day...certainly of greater weight than just four years of war under a foreign power (that is if you consider the CSA its own independent nation...as I do).

      As for your other rather uninformed point, considering that the US government still considered the institution of slavery legal in five US States and US held Southern territory until the 13th Amendment went into effect on January 1, 1866 - those who fought for the Union were ALSO fighting to defend the right to own another human being, technically speaking.

      I do thank you for your comment though.

      Delete
  4. "Hatred of the Confederate flag -- indeed hatred of Confederate heritage itself -- is pro-white supremacist."
    Yeah, and hatred of adultery, gambling, and pornography is hatred of Christianity. You can say it but it doesn't make it so.

    "condemning the misuse of the Confederate flag as a symbol of hatred."
    Being that it's *original* use was as a symbol of hatred and suppression of black people and as a war banner in the fight against the United States...what other use could one have in mind?

    "virtually the only people today who have a moral right to define what that flag and its heritage stands for."
    The flag's definition and what it stood for was decide back in 1860 or so. You can attempt to revise history all you like but that's all you're doing....attempting to revise history.

    "Southern heritage organizations have been working to promote the positive aspects of that heritage, "
    As I said in my editorial, there are many positive aspects of our heritage. That flag and what it represented and continues to represent isn't among them.

    "Some of them are not always the narrow-minded fanatics who drink the kool-aid of politically correct ideology and close their minds and hearts to any thinking that doesn't conform to their worldview."

    "Who feel any sort of dialogue is beneath them, and view anyone who disagrees with their own set opinions with nothing but contempt."

    "and reject any gesture of good will, while at the same time applying broad labels to others, mocking them, calling them any sort of vile, hateful name; "

    Did you read some of the other comments under my editorial? But you didn't manage to address any of those commenters, did you?

    And speaking of "applying broad labels to others, mocking them, calling them any sort of vile, hateful name"...isn't it a bit disingenuous of you to then use terms like "politically correct drone", "typical white Liberal " (immediately after getting all verklempt about those who call conservatives of all stripes "racist"), "a lower part of the anatomy to describe what they are"

    "White supremacists adopted that flag, it's been co-opted as their symbol, and its therefore racist. "
    It's not racist because white supremacists adopted it. White supremacists adopted it because its originators intended it as a symbol of oppression and terrorism against black people.

    "White supremacist groups who continue to misuse the Dixie Cross..."
    They don't "continue to misuse" it. They use it exactly in the manner in which it was intended to be used.

    "all Southerners,"
    Nope.

    "when you reject the premise of a living Southern heritage and identity"
    Which, of course, I distinctly did NOT do in my editorial. Your conflation of the Con flag with pride in Southern heritage is baloney.

    "those who choose to inflict terror with that flag"
    You mean like its originators did?

    Bottom line: You can spin it any way you like and you can attempt to revise history until you meet yourself coming the other way but you can't make that flag something other than what it was originally intended for...a symbol of oppression and terrorism.

    Now, have some of this cornbread and pass me the greens.



    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well time for a little Pwnage, line-by-line:

      "Hatred of the Confederate flag -- indeed hatred of Confederate heritage itself -- is pro-white supremacist."

      (That's what I said, don't wear it out.)

      Yeah, and hatred of adultery, gambling, and pornography is hatred of Christianity. You can say it but it doesn't make it so.

      (Well I can certainly see where you think Southerners who oppose how you think stand. Thanks for that clarification...and for the record, it's not just me that makes that claim.)

      Being that it's *original* use was as a symbol of hatred and suppression of black people and as a war banner in the fight against the United States...what other use could one have in mind?

      (Actually, its original use was as a battle flag for field identification purposes for an army of men defending their land from an unconstitutional invasion, so your original premise is wrong. As for the other uses...we will get to that momentarily.)

      The flag's definition and what it stood for was decide back in 1860 or so. You can attempt to revise history all you like but that's all you're doing....attempting to revise history.

      (Don't mean to be a grammar policeman here, but don't you mean: "was decided back in 1860". Since it is also a living symbol, it's definition was not entirely decided in 1860 - and FYI that flag was not designed until Nov 1861, Maybe read a book once in awhile .Also having a different perspective of how one views and interprets history is not revision of history by definition. But keep trying.)

      As I said in my editorial, there are many positive aspects of our heritage. That flag and what it represented and continues to represent isn't among them.

      (Actually it is, but I can understand how you missed the point. As I pointed out in another blog post, Southern heritage is like a vast quilt with many aspects linked together. Confederate history and heritage are very much a part of that, and even if you find them personally unsavory, many do not. To deny that would fall under the definition of "revising history".)

      Did you read some of the other comments under my editorial? But you didn't manage to address any of those commenters, did you?

      (As a matter of fact I did...but somehow those posts didn't seem to make muster, I wonder why that is? Do YOU have an answer for that sir?)

      And speaking of "applying broad labels to others, mocking them, calling them any sort of vile, hateful name"...isn't it a bit disingenuous of you to then use terms like "politically correct drone", "typical white Liberal " (immediately after getting all verklempt about those who call conservatives of all stripes "racist"), "a lower part of the anatomy to describe what they are"

      (Hey, me calls em like me sees em, dude.)

      Delete
    2. It's not racist because white supremacists adopted it. White supremacists adopted it because its originators intended it as a symbol of oppression and terrorism against black people.

      (Uh, see previous, and you're being unnecessarily repetitive.)

      They don't "continue to misuse" it. They use it exactly in the manner in which it was intended to be used.

      (Not according to millions of Southern-born people and Confederate descendants worldwide, sir. Also, consider that it is a living symbol and that each ensuing generation adds a bit more to its legacy, in good and in bad ways.)

      "all Southerners,"
      Nope.

      (Yep. It's even still your symbol too even if you choose not to accept that fact.)

      "when you reject the premise of a living Southern heritage and identity"
      Which, of course, I distinctly did NOT do in my editorial. Your conflation of the Con flag with pride in Southern heritage is baloney.

      (It is pride in one aspect of a whole, sir. It is not my fault you simply choose to misinterpret....but I have hope you can catch up with all of us.)

      "those who choose to inflict terror with that flag" You mean like its originators did?

      (The only "terror" that flag was intended to inflict originally was fear in enemy soldiers who were invading another land they have no authority over according to the legitimately elected governing body of said land.)

      Bottom line: You can spin it any way you like and you can attempt to revise history until you meet yourself coming the other way but you can't make that flag something other than what it was originally intended for...a symbol of oppression and terrorism.

      (Actually the bottom line is that you choose not to see a living heritage, nor the fact that there have been two separate generations since the 60s and 70s where your apparent willingness to learn about said heritage, or contribute to it in any meaningful way abruptly ended according to your own words in the article sir.)

      Now, have some of this cornbread and pass me the greens.

      (No thanks, I save the soul food for New Years Day. However, I do have some nice cherry cobbler and pecan pie...but those are only for good boys. Have a nice day, slapnutz.)

      Delete
    3. Rick Bohan, you're revising history, spinning data, and altering the facts to get the generic PC approved outcome. First fact to note is the date of this C.W. post... more than 2 months before the June 17 South Carolina tragedy.

      On March 28 2015, at least 6 out of 10 US citizens knew the Confederate Flag to be a symbol of Southern Heritage and pride. It's been true for decades. A fact partially confirmed by two CNN polls, one from 15 years ago one from this year. (The CNN poll from this year had a PC bias to it that artificially lowered the percent to 57 out of 100 viewing the Confederate Flag as a positive symbol of heritage and pride. The true number is greater than 60% when the unscientific bias errors in the CNN poll are eliminated with more advanced mathematical and scientific methodology. Those more advanced methods put the level of certainty far beyond that of the usual primitive polling methods with their + or - 3 or 4 point error. Of course, the primitive, PC approved polling methods always have greater error rates for "African-Americans" than the error rates for non-blacks. It's all math and science beyond your comprehension, Rick.)

      The truth is that politicians, PC leaders and people like you exploited the South Carolina church massacre to try to change that US majority view... and now that PC attempt to redefine the Confederate Flag as a racist symbol is falling apart because the witch hunt death toll is still increasing.

      Obama, Nikki Haley and the PC now have the blood of another police officer on their hands. The death of Anthony Hervey, two ABC news people in Virginia, the Houston Deputy at a gas station, now at a mall... on it goes. All because of the PC's anti-police, anti-US witch hunt war expanded to include an anti-Confederate witch hunt.

      Confederates are among the most pro-US people on the planet. The PC fascists, among the most anti-US, they're the ISIS-like-Americans out to destroy all US heritage.

      The battle for the US is about to get biblical in scale Rick and you're on the losing side.

      Delete
    4. Carl -- I think your premise continues to be proven. The attempt promulgated in the 1990s by the NAACP was to turn the Confederate Battle Flag into a symbol of nothing more than racist hatred. Hence, I was shocked to hear the words "we all know that the Flag is NOT all about hatred" directly out of Jesse Jackson's lips during the agitation following the Roof murders; but then, he was speaking to a group of South Carolinians and knew he had to speak some sense in order to be taken seriously. That's one reason I feel that anyone speaking the PC-party line of "the Flag = Racism" has to either be a very naive tool or a knowing racialist whose evil intentions are on proud display.

      What is sad is that demonizing the Flag may help fundraising and membership numbers for the NAACP, the SPLC and other hate groups, as they gather their malcontents. But in creating a target for hate, they do themselves and their communities a disservice. For the Communists who seek a destabilization of communities, this is their goal. But for those looking for hope, it creates despair and a dead end.

      More important, it serves Dylann Roof's desire for a race war, and not the Christian reconciliation and forgiveness the Charleston Nine's families demonstrated.

      Booket T. Washington once wrote that the best interests of one race would never again work against the best interests of another race, for such would be working against themselves. He, of course, was speaking about the horrific legacy of Reconstruction - a period about which there is perhaps more historical ignorance than any other. And yet, here we are again - as people are what we all are.

      The only good way out is honoring the best in the Battle Flag and what it represents - and to dishonor all those who would dishonor it. It was an evil thing when Lincoln made the War "all about slavery" 150 years ago, and it is still an evil today.

      Delete
  5. Your "throwing out the baby with the bath water" explanation doesn't make any sense in suggesting the opposition is supporting pro-white supremacists. The PC culture activists are just plain ignorant, hypocritical bigots. These liberal activists are supporting the supremacist mentality by demonstrating that they are Nazis. (i.e. Anything they want, then they must have now. All those that don't obey their belief system will be destroyed. They will censor anything that disagrees with their belief system.) These radicals don't want to find and learn the truth. They just love to hide away in their own ivory tower of ignorant bliss. The liberal faux outrage is their defensive mechanism to silence all criticism and shutdown debate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Look at it from the objective POV David:

      (1) People who hate the flag site the misuse of the flag as a tool of racism by white supremacists.
      (2) Southern heritage defenders like the SCV and UDC - the legitimate heirs of the Confederate soldier and his symbols - have passed resolutions against such misuses and have been actively fighting against such misuses and quite vocal in speaking out against them for the last 30 years.

      (3)Said opponents of the flag reject and even mock as irrelevant the legitimate actions by Southern heritage defenders to fight against racism.

      When you consider all those points, there is only one logical and undeniable answer: the opponents of that flag reject Southern heritage defenders views while accepting as legitimate the very misuse of that flag by white supremacists who despise anyone who disagree with them.

      By accepting the latter view as more legitimate, they themselves offer indirect support to said white supremacists and such misuses over forward-thinking Southern heritage defenders.

      To me a person who mocks the idea of "heritage not hatred" might as well be wearing a white sheet, waving a flag they have no right to, and calling someone an n-word themselves....and that's exactly how I choose to treat the opponents of that flag.

      Delete
  6. “As a people we are fighting to maintain the heavenly ordained supremacy of the white man over the inferior or colored race; a white flag would thus be emblematical of our cause. Such a flag would be a suitable emblem of our young confederacy, and sustained by the brave hearts and strong arms of the south, it would soon take rank among the proudest ensigns of the nations, and be hailed by the civilized world as THE WHITE MAN’S FLAG.”

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For those who are unaware - given that Reina here failed to offer any source material - she is endeavoring to quote a newspaper writer named William T. Thompson and the quote is dated April 23, 1863. Thompson is credited with coming up with the proposed design for the Confederate Second National Flag "the Stainless Banner" which became the national colors for the CSA officially on May 2, 1863.

      However, what Reina here fails to point out is the actual point of her quote.
      Are you endeavoring to use cut-n-paste history found on anti-Southern hate webpages as many amateurs who attempt to do in hopes of looking more knowledgeable than you truly are? If so I am afraid you are quite behind the times as this particular talking point has been refuted time and time again. Luckily you have someone like me here to help you keep up.

      Though Thompson himself is credited with the proposed design the final actual design was created by the Confederate Flag and Seal Committee itself. The first official use of the flag itself was to cover the coffin of Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, a man credited with opening a Sunday School to teach black children (slave and freemen) to learn to read the Bible. That use alone completely negates the "white man's flag" argument, and there are many MANY more examples of the use of the Confederate 2nd National banner to add to that as well, but I digress.

      I am sorry Reina, but I cannot offer you any points for originality. But by all means, do write again, but try and bring someone of substance to the conversation next time.

      Peace Out!

      Delete